Care Inspectorate scoops quality improvement award

National award ceremony celebrates quality improvement initiatives

The Care Inspectorate is among individuals and organisations highlighted for their work to improve services for babies, children, young people and families at the Quality Improvement Awards 2018.

The collaboration between the Care Inspectorate, Gargieston Early Childhood Centre and Springhill Care Home picked up the top award in the Most Inspiring / Innovative category for the implementation of an intergenerational programme.

The programme delivered sessions focused on physical activity, relationship building and maximised learning opportunities for children and adults.  

The Quality Improvement Awards celebrate the collaborative work carried out by schools, health visitors, doctors, nurses, midwives, social workers, family services and anyone working to improve services for children across Scotland. Their work helps to strengthen services and ensure their availability to every child throughout all aspects of their lives, providing equal opportunity to thrive, learn and succeed.

Springhill Care Home is a Georgian B listed building which was built as a family home (Springhill House) in 1830 by Archibald Finnie, one of the main employers in Kilmarnock during one of Ayrshire’s golden ages of commerce.

The building has recently been refurbished and the reopening of the home in September marks the first stage of a £200,000 investment in the building by new owners Silverline Care, who took over the management of the care home in July 2017.

Deputy First Minister, John Swinney, who presented the awards, said: “The Quality Improvement Awards demonstrate the commitment from individuals and organisations working to improve the lives of children, young people and families. The awards provide an opportunity to share best practice and improvement methods that are having a positive impact on people across Scotland. It is a great honour to reward those who are passionate about making Scotland the best place to grow up.”

Eileen Welch, Springhill’s home manager, said: “The Springhill family, which is made up of staff, residents and relatives and visitors, have loved being a part of the intergenerational project. It has been amazing to see the benefits on our residents and the children first hand and I’m ecstatic that the project has won this award and received the recognition I know it deserves. We wish to congratulate everyone involved and we believe this win is a springboard for Springhill as we continue to strive for excellence by creating a culture of embracing new ideas, developing solutions and putting them into action.

Carole Wilkinson, Chair of Healthcare Improvement Scotland, said: “The QI awards provide a fantastic opportunity to celebrate the wide range of quality improvement work taking place across Scotland. These projects aim to make health and social care services the best they can be, so people can experience the best care possible.  Congratulations to all winners and nominees for their dedication to making a real difference to the lives of children, young people and families. They can all be incredibly proud.”

 

 

The 2018 Awards attracted a wide range of strong and innovative projects across nine categories, illustrating ways in which local people and teams have improved health, early years and family services and schools.

 

Winners were announced at the QI Awards ceremony on Tuesday 13th November at the Radisson Blu in Glasgow.